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Magnificent Microbes at the Dundee Science Centre

09-Mar-2016

Have you ever walked through a giant intestine or grown the bacteria that live on your hands? Do you want to!? If so, Magnificent Microbes, the dazzling introduction to microscopic life on 12 March 2016 is the event for you!

Since 2010, Professor Nicola Stanley-Wall and a team of over 30 Molecular Microbiologists have revealed the secrets of microbe life to school children, families and adults and kids of all ages through a programme of activities, games and exhibits demonstrating that there’s much more to science than meets the eye.

Professor Stanley-Wall said, “Our bodies contain millions of microbes, they help shape our environment, and we use them without knowing it everyday.

“Because of their size, people don’t realise just how interesting and important microbes are or the broad range of critical functions that microbes play in our bodies, our environment, food production and medicine. 

“We hope that we’ll be able to give people a better understanding of what microbiology is.  With some of the youngsters, it might even persuade them to pursue a career in science.”

Among the little known facts about these little “creatures” are:

·         Ants can use the bacteria on that live on their bodies to produce their own antibiotics.
·         Bacteria can be used to fight pollution.
·         Microbes can glow in the dark.
·         Lots of commonly consumed food and drink products are made using fungi or bacteria.

Come along to this exciting family fun day out, take a walk through our giant gut, make a healthy poo and design your own Martian bacteria.

The first day of the event will be for schools only, with around 200 primary School pupils from the local area, while on Saturday, 12 March 2016 the event takes place at Dundee Science Centre, from 10am to 4pm as part of the Women in Science Festival.

Entry to the event is FREE and includes free entry to Dundee Science Centre. Booking is needed so please contact:

 

Sam Wallace at: sam.wallace@dundeesciencecentre.org.uk