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Congratulations following Promotions for Academic Staff

14-Oct-2016

As part of the 2016 Annual Review process for academic staff Alessio Ciulli, Vicky Cowling, Sonia Rocha and Helen Walden have been promoted to Personal Chair (Professor) and Sarah Coulthurst has been promoted to Reader. “I would like to congratulate these outstanding individuals for their well deserved promotions,” said Professor Julian Blow, Dean of Research in the School of Life Sciences. “Encouraging excellence is a core value of the School but that needs to be followed up with recognition and reward. These promotions indicate not only to the individuals themselves but also to the wider scientific community the strength of their contributions. We hope that all members of the School will join me when I host a celebration event for their achievements.”

The researchers work in areas ranging from drug discovery to anti-microbial resistance, indicating the wide breath of research and knowledge base we have in the School. Alessio has been bestowed with numerous awards in the past couple of years including becoming a Fellow of Royal Society of Chemistry. His lab, based in Biological Chemistry and Drug Discovery, is specifically concerned with studies of druggability of PPIs to small molecule modulators.

Vicky who is a Lister Institute Fellow and MRC Senior Fellow is based in the Centre for Gene Regulation and Regulation (GRE). Her research is focussed on investigating the regulation, function and therapeutic potential of the mRNA cap. Her departmental colleague Sonia who is deputy head of GRE and a CRUK Senior Research Fellow, investigates the mechanisms controlling gene expression in hypoxia.

Helen is a Programme Leader in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation and Ubiquitylation Unit where her research looks into specificity and disease in the ubiquitin system. Her promotion follows her award of the prestigious Colworth Medal in 2014. Sarah is a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow in Molecular Microbiology. Her overall research aims are to elucidate how Gram-negative bacterial pathogens are able to cause disease, not only providing an improved understanding of this basic biology but also contributing to novel therapeutic antimicrobial strategies.

A school-wide celebration to acknowledge these achievements will take place in the near future. Details will be circulated in due course.